Highly Unlikely at “High-Rise”


The "fingers" of High-Rise building
The “fingers” of High-Rise buildings

We went to see the movie of J.G. Ballard’s dystopian novel “High-Rise” recently and this post is not going to be about my reaction to the movie, which actually made me think of Passolini (“Salo“)and Fellini (“Satyricon“) and also Derek Jarman’s “Jubilee” from 1978, all of which go to show that it is very hard to create something that is truly new, original or shocking.   As far as the film’s relevance to society today this piece in CityMetric (from the New Statesman) does a good job in relating the themes to modernism’s architectural failures so don’t worry I am not going to launch into a diatribe against the class-based nature of contemporary Britain.

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Hail, Caesar! – Allegory Not Satire


Wardrobe Theatre
Wardrobe Theatre

The question is, “why do I feel that I need to write something about the movies and plays that we go and see in my blog?”  I suppose it calls into question the whole enterprise of the blog and what it is for and who is it for.  At the very least it will form some sort of record of our time in Bath; of the things that we did and saw and thought about.  We recently went to see a play written by the daughter of our Oxford chums.  It was staged at the Wardrobe Theatre in the Old Market Assembly, Bristol as part of a short season by a writers’ cooperative.  I didn’t want to write too much about a new young playwright’s work but really it asked much the same questions about striving to create art, about self-belief and about how we judge our own work and abilities and how others judge it and especially those who have the power to decide what happens to our work.

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“A Bigger Short” – Financial and Relationship Crashes


Big Short Guys
Big Short Guys

As the winter continues and it is getting really quite cold now we are still uninclined to go motoring out of Bath visiting places or touring around.  Consequently we are making the best use we can of the cultural resources available. Last week we saw movies at both The Little Theatre art house cinema, for the “bobos”, and the Odeon multiplex, for “the masses”.  The former is somewhat grungy but has what they like to call the “Silver Screen” shows at 10.30am on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings for Seniors at which one is met with a sea of silver-grey heads all clutching their free coffees and biscuits while at the latter, during the daytime shows in the week, one is generally sharing an empty auditorium with about three or four other people, either seniors, shift workers or the unemployed.  But to be fair, the Odeon seems to be well run and is clean and comfortable and the young staff always very pleasant and helpful and they tend to have short, neat haircuts instead of pony tails.

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